Wednesday, 8 June 2011

Guildford and surrounding area

It was only a few minutes walk into Guildford's shopping centre from our mooring on Shalford Meadow - and you will believe that we trod that path often - retail therapy and sight-seeing.
Jamie Oliver's Italian Restaurant but no dogs so we didn't go there!
Looks interesting ...
... even more interesting through the archway ...
The Royal Grammar School founded in 1509
Holy Trinity Church - brick built Georgian church, palladian in style, completed in 1763
The Chancel ...
... and high alter ...
... beautiful stained glass windows ...
... this one of a more contemporary design ...
.. a couple of windows have the makers sign on them - a monk - if you click to enlarge this picture you may see it engraved just to the right above the inscription.
The monument to George Abbot - Guildford's most famous son who was the Archbishop of Canterbury 1611-1633.  He also commissioned the building of Abbot's Hospital opposite the church and was one of the translators of the King James Bible.
... macabre! ...
The pulpit dates back to 1769 but was reduced in height in 1869.
I liked the fact that the interior was painted white with little adornment except for the lovely alter and windows.
Hospital of the Blessed Trinity, founded by George Abbot, Archbishop of Canterbury 1619.  Not a hospital as we know it today, but as an almshouse it is a hospital in its old sense - a charitable institution for the housing and maintenance of the ... aged' (Oxford/English Dictionary).  This place has been providing housing for the people of Guildford since 1622.
George Abbot was born in a cottage at the bottom of the High Street, Guildford in 1562 and educated at the Royal Grammar School.  He died in 1633.
A window etching from 1870
The courtyard garden of the hospital ...
... with more accommodation through the archway.
Back into town and I spy these youngsters high up on the parapet ... just chillin!
The Guildhall is Elizabethan but probably stands on the site of an earlier building where the merchants would meet to run the town's affairs ...
... the beautifully gilded elaborate clock projects high over the street ...
... and the bell turret was added in 1683.
Guildford Castle was probably built soon after the Norman invasion in 1066; the massive square keep built in the mid-1100's.  The castle was abandoned in the 1370's.
Castle Arch in Quarry Street was built in 1256 during King Henry III's reign and in 1611 King James I sold the castle to Francis Carter an under keeper of the park and an important local official who built the house by the arch ...
 ... on the remains of the gatehouse built for Henry III; parts of the medieval walls can be traced in the house and other parts are built of re-used chalk from the castle walls.
In the 18th century the house became less important and was divided into apartments and the estate was divided up and rented out to different people ...
... the great tower became a garden feature of 49 Quarry Street!

 ... Castle Street ...
 ... the surviving walls are 12th and 13th century ...
 ... The Keep, high on the hill ...
... not much has changed here ...
... since 1885!
These engravings ...
... on the outer perimeter wall show ...
... what life may have been like in the castle in 1256
The gardens have not yet had their summer plantings
The view as we climbed the hill to the tower
The bowling green and castle ... the bowling green has been in existence since at least the 1660's
The Chapel - in 1359 the doors and windows were strengthened for security and much of the graffiti here is thought to have been done by prisoners
After the castle was abandoned in the 1370's the keep was probably used by the Sheriff to house prisoners ...
... see how thick the walls are ...
We could see this building from our mooring but had no idea what it was.
... the skyline - Trinity Church on the right and the almshouse towers on the left ...
... and the cathedral up on a hill in the far distance ...
... a partly renovated window showing what it would have looked like when new - the two apertures above are the latrines (garderobe)... charming!!
Signs that there was a river industry here, but no longer
A victorian grotto on the Pilgrims' Way - where those who pass are 'treading the path trod by Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Pilgrims in the reign of King Edward III' ...
... built where a natural stream emerges and flows into the Thames ...
The Stream
Your upward path, my downward flow are fixed by law divine.  My task is to refresh your soul, yours to discover mine.
... click on the picture to read ...
... up the steep lane or holloway to St Catherine's Hill ...
... and St Catherine's Church - this is the building we could see from our mooring and from the top of the castle ...
... you can see for miles and miles from up here ...
... into Guildford - the castle and Trinity Church ...
'The church has been disused since the 16th century.  This reconstruction is based on the earliest drawings of the ruins, which belong to the 18th century.  There is still uncertainty about a number of aspects of its original appearance' ...
... a 1787 engraving of ...

... St Catherine's Chapel
... there's lots more interesting information here :-
River Wey & Navigations : Godalming Navigation final section - St ...
... another distant view from the top of St Catherine's Hill and a beautiful copper spire.
Returning to our mooring on the meadow - the carving reads - These meadows are part of Shalford House Estate, the house is gone but the parkland remains saved for the publics' pleasure.
Near the end of our stay in Guildford there are two places still to visit - the Cathedral and the Alice in Wonderland statue which we missed when visiting the castle.  But the day was marred by a horrible incident in the park where the picture below was taken.
Alice through the looking glass.
As we approached this secluded area of the park with Molly (our Patterdale Terrier) on her extended lead, we saw three men sitting on a bench with 'tinnies' (cans of beer/lager) and when they saw us the youngest one got up and was looking around desperately, but he wasn't quick enough, his dog a Staffordshire Bull Terrier came tearing at us from behind the bushes and attacked Molly. Luckily Molly was wearing a harness and George was able to lift her up without bending but not quickly enough, the staffy caught her rear-end. The youth knew that his dog was vicious with other dogs and that it should have been on a lead but you can't argue with a drunk can you?  George was in a mood to 'clock' him one but it wouldn't have helped at all - we were both very, very shaken I can tell you.  Once we were out of there we checked Molly over and all seemed to be ok, no visible wound and she was walking and acting as normal, so we continued our walk.
Sheep statues at Eastgate Court in the centre of Guildford ...
... and on to the Cathedral - this is the children's garden but they seem to have lost the ball!
Guildford Cathedral's main entrance ...
... and at the back ...
... and the gilded angel on the top of the tower ...
... a rather utilitarian building I thought ...
... started in 1936 and completed in 1961...
... was designed by Sir Edward Maufe Edward Maufe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
... the inside belies the exterior though; inside it was very impressive - this is Walking Madonna ...
... and its origins...
Madonna and Child by John Cobbett carved into one of the columns - very nice ...
... looking towards the alter ...
... the organ ...
... the cathedral stands on Stag Hill and this tile in the centre of the crossing marks the centre of the cathedral and summit of the hill...
... very simple ...
... with some lovely touches ...
... organ pipes above the Bishop's Throne and Choir ...
... looking back to the main entrance - just look at those columns ...
... photo's just don't do the justice - they were imposing and impressive - if anyone has read Ken Follett's Pillars of the Earth - this building reminds me those very early churches.
A small private chapel ...
... information regarding the lectern.
An electric organ over the Choir with lovely winding stairs behind ...
... eye catching indeed ...
... Cruciform Vision ...
The Lady Chapel ...
... and the Chapter House

I really like this view down the corridor, past those winding stairs to the organ and on into the church between those great towering columns.
A modern take ...
... on the crucifixion...
... and last but certainly not least is the peaceful Children's Chapel.
I think George is asleep as I leave the cathedral ...
... the view over Guildford is called The Hogs Back.
Walking back to the mooring - the Electricity Works is now the Electric Theatre ...
Alice with her sister are reading Alice in Wonderland when they spy the white rabbit.
Don't look now if you are squeamish ...
Early the following morning after Molly was attacked she woke up crying, George took her out for a pee and put her on our bed on a blanket; she was shivering and obviously not well.  There was a strange smell too - I put on the lights and checked her out, there was moisture on her left hind quarter; she must have been bitten yesterday.  We rang the local vet as soon as it opened and took her along.  He clipped the hair around the site and this is what was found - a nasty bite and it had become infected - I am shaking with anger even as I write this over a week later - it's a good job we've left Guildford - up to that point we had thoroughly enjoyed our time there.

1 comment:

  1. Your pictures of Guildford and particularly of the Guildhall bought back childhood memories. It was near there that my new school uniform was purchased before being taken to boarding school near Cranleigh. The Wey and Aran Canal ran through the grounds where we went for a crafty (or not so) fag/ Perhaps this is where my love of canals began!

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